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The pronoun refers to President Lincoln. President Lincoln is the ANTECEDENT for the pronoun. You want to be careful with your writing and make sure you are clear and correct with your pronouns. Most of the time to slow down and work on a careful treatment will reveal problems like these, which can be easily corrected. The pronoun « sound » is often used with indeterminate individual pronouns, but this is not always correct in formal writing. Here is an example that shows a pronomen-antecedent chord error: the sentence must be rewritten by replacing the pronoun with a name: the example above could be corrected in different ways: pronouns play an important role in the English language. Pronouns replace names, so that without pronouns, your writing could be repetitive. Here are some common errors that you should monitor with pronouns. A frequent Pronoun chord error occurs when a writer uses a simple nominus as a student to represent students in general. Then, later, the writer can use them as a pronoun to replace students, because the author thinks of students in general. This is often the case when people try to avoid this structure and use complicated word choices like him, them or (where) men, because they are not singular pronouns neutral from the point of view of sex in English. The use of these variations is not preferred, and rewriting the sentence is a better option. While the pronouns they were historically only plural, it is grammatically acceptable to use them as singular pronouns.

They should always be used when they relate to more than one person. They can also be used as a single pronode depending on sex if they refer to a person, if the sex is unknown, or if you know that the person prefers them as their personal pronoun. For example: Note that it is clear what is the precursor for each of the pronouns: she (the student), she (the student), she (the paper). Pronoun-Antecedent errors occur when a pronoun does not agree with its predecessor, which can cause confusion in your letter. The pronoun refers to employees, so the pronoun should be plural and not the singular that he or she.

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